Race/Ethnicity

Water in the Middle East & Africa: A Nexus of Cooperation and Conflict

Water experts from around the world will gather at UCLA to discuss the shared resource challenges facing Africa and the Middle East as well as the cutting-edge policy and technology solutions being used and developed to overcome them.
Complete information on the conference and speakers is available on the conference website MidEastAfrica-Water.org

O FILME DA MINHA VIDA / A MOVIE ABOUT MY LIFE

Screening followed by Q&A with Brazilian director, writer, actor Selton Mello

Wednesday, May 02, 2018
7:30 PM - 10:00 PM
Melnitz Hall 1409
UCLA James Bridges Theater

Doors open at 7:00 pm

About the film:

Based on a novel "A Distant Father" by Antonio Skármeta. Young Tony decides to return to his hometown. There, he discovers his father has returned to France claiming to miss his friends and country of origin. Tony ends up becoming a teacher, and finds himself amid conflicts and inexperience.

The Paul Torrens Health Forum at UCLA - April 2018

Power to Heal: Medicare and the Civil Rights Revolution
Before Medicare was established in 1965, disparities in access to hospital care were dramatic. Less than half the nation's hospitals served black and white patients equally, and in the South, one third of hospitals would not admit African-Americans even for emergencies. Medicare was used to mount a dramatic, coordinated effort that desegregated thousands of hospitals across the country in a matter of months.

CMRS Movie: “Ran”

Akira Kurosawa’s brilliantly conceived re-telling of Shakespeare’s King Lear magically mixes Japanese history, Shakespeare’s plot and Kurosawa’s own feelings about loyalty in the masterpiece, “Ran”. Set in 16th-century Japan, Lord Hidetora, announces his intention to divide his land equally among his three sons. This decision to step down unleashes a power struggle between the three heirs. (Running time: 2 hours, 42 minutes)

Advance registration is requested. Please click here to complete the short registration form.

Maimonaides and the Merchant

The advent of Islam in the seventh century brought profound economic changes to the Middle East and to the Jews living there. The Talmud, written in and for an agrarian society, was in many ways ill-equipped for the new economy. In the early Islamic period, the Babylonian Geonim made accommodations through their responsa, through occasional taqqanot, and especially by applying the concept that custom can be a source of law.

Ula Taylor, “The Promise of Patriarchy: Women and the Nation of Islam”

Ula Taylor will speak about her new book, The Promise of Patriarchy: Women and the Nation of Islam (UNC Press, 2017). Taylor will discuss the significance of women’s politics within the Nation of Islam (NOI), one of the most significant African American religious and political organizations of the twentieth century. She analyzes the complexities of members’ gender consciousness and women’s political activities within the NOI, which promised protection and empowerment under the guise of patriarchy.

Maria Josephine Barrios-LeBlanc, “Languages and Literatures Beyond English: Dreaming in Filipino”

Part of The Philippines and its Elsewheres

A series organized by the UCLA Center for Southeast Asian Studies

Featuring:

Maria Josephine Barrios-LeBlanc, Department of South and Southeast Asian Studies, UC Berkeley
Nenita Domingo, Department of Asian Languages and Cultures, UCLA
Kie Zuraw, Department of Linguistics. UCLA

Don Mee Choi’s Hardly War

Please join the UCLA Center for Korean Studies as Don Mee Choi reads from her latest collection of poetry entitled Hardly War (2016). Using visual artifacts from her father’s archive, a photographer during the Korean and Viet Nam wars, Choi combines imagery with poetry, opera, and memoir to examine the devastating impact of the unfinished Korean War.

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